John Foster / 28 Apr 2023

Never Fully European

David Graeber’s Final Books

David Graeber’s death in September 2020 was a tragedy. Few radicals are as intellectually curious and creative as he was.(...)

Charlie Bertsch / 16 Feb 2023

Ukraine in Hindsight

Edward Berger’s All Quiet on the Western Front

All Quiet on the Western Front, Edward Berger’s astoundingly brutal adaptation of Eric Maria Remarque’s 1929 novel about World War I – the favourite to win this year’s Best International Film Oscar – is timely to a degree that would have been hard to imagine when the project began.(...)
John Foster / 27 Jan 2023

The End of Franco

Agitated: Grupos Autónomos and Armed Anticapitalism in Spain, by Joni D.

The 1970s was a decade of broken dreams. The end of the postwar boom brought to a close the era of middle-class liberalism in Europe and North America.(...)

John Foster / 16 Dec 2022

Fantasy Island

Free Market: The History of an Idea, by Jacob Soll

It’s as though the 1980s never happened. For many Gen Xers like me, until the 2008 financial crisis, the free market was the only game in town.(...)

John Foster / 25 Nov 2022

Think Different

Culture from the Slums, by Jeff Hayton

Based on the flurry of academic titles about it over the last decade, punk has become as common to college curriculums as it is to the Top 40. Why this took so long is baffling.(...)

Charlie Bertsch / 17 Nov 2022

Neither the US nor Russia

Sergio Leone’s Fistful of Dollars

Because Sergio Leone didn’t make films set in Europe or ones that obviously dealt with the continent’s problems, he has been excluded from the pantheon of its greatest postwar auteurs: Cocteau, Bergman, Fellini, Godard, Fassbinder, Truffaut, and Antonioni. (...)

Charlie Bertsch / 03 Nov 2022

Breaking the Rules

Daisies, by Věra Chytilová

Czech filmmaker Věra Chytilová’s insisted that her remarkable 1966 film Daisies was a critique of decadence, personified in the young women, both named Marie, who are its protagonists. (...)

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